Drain Tile: Your Basement’s Path of Least Resistance

Drain Tile: Your Basement's Path of Least Resistance

Drain Tile: Your Basement's Path of Least Resistance

Basement – Drain Tile Test

A dry basement can provide years of comfort and energy savings in a home. Basements can also be converted into additional living space in the home with proper waterproofing and contractor-guided techniques. A properly functioning interior drain tile system is paramount in maintaining a dry basement. The risk of a basement flood increases with the age of a drain tile system and the amount of rainfall received.

What Is The Purpose Of Drain Tile?

The name drain tile is often confusing to many homeowners. In actuality, the term “tile” is a reference back to homes built before the 1950s that used an orange clay material that resembled tile. They allowed water to channel into the soil outside the foundation. These old systems failed over time and modern replacements in drain tile use material like heavy-duty plastic. The purpose of an interior drain tile system is to move water away from the foundation and the home by guiding the water into the sump crock and ejecting it with a sump pump.

When Drain Tile Fails

Drain tile in the interior of a basement can fail in several ways. Most commonly, drain tile can have infiltration from soil or tree roots that are placed too close to the home, it can crack and break as the home shifts and settles over time, it can fill with mud, sand or shale and bleeders and weep holes can become clogged. These can result in a leak against the cove of the wall. There are also some additional considerations:

* Level of water table in your area

A high water table increases the chance of water seeping in cracks under the slab.

* The age of the home and type of footing

Older homes may have a footing that is too narrow. They also may have original clay tile that is broken or missing.

* Grade or slop of the slab

A subtle exterior grade towards the sump pump is common in older homes. Modern drain tile takes this slope along the interior of the footing towards the sump pump, rather than allowing the water to collect on the exterior of the home.

* Type of soil

Heavy clay soils tend to hold water against the foundation. This increase in water retention is often referred to as hydrostatic pressure and can not only cause water infiltration, but structural problems as well.

Milwaukee basement repair contractor Accurate Basement Repair recommends taking all of these factors into consideration when researching an interior drain tile system repair.

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