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Accurate Basement Repair 

With 18 years of experience, we’re not just good, we’re Accurate! Our goal at Accurate Basement Repair is to provide top-quality foundation repair and basement waterproofing services in a professional and efficient manner. We are known as the “real estate transaction repair specialists” and are the #1 referred foundation repair company by professional engineers, basement consultants, realtors, municipal building inspectors, home inspectors, lenders, property management companies and most importantly, our past customers. Our dedicated and educated staff of long-term employees treats each of our customer’s homes as if they were their own. In addition to working year-round, we also maintain a fleet of equipment with some of the newest technologies in the industry, enabling us to continually provide our customers with the best care possible. Waterproofing is rarely a do-it-yourself job. Professionals at Accurate Basement Repair repair drain tile, install dehumidifiers, optimize sump pumps and otherwise provide complete foundation waterproofing services. Our skilled technicians and nationally certified structural repair and waterproofing specialists have been serving Milwaukee homes and businesses since Bon Jovi was headlining Summerfest. We are a local business with an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau.  We use a synergistic approach of continually educating our staff and in turn, educating our homeowners.

Call us at (414) 744-6900 today for your FREE estimate! We’re not just good, we’re Accurate!

Facts About Wisconsin

The first European known to have landed in Wisconsin was Jean Nicolet. In 1634, Samuel de Champlain, governor of New France, sent Nicolet to contact the Ho-Chunk people, make peace between them and the Huron and expand the fur trade, and possibly to also find a water route to Asia. Accompanied by seven Huron guides, Nicolet left New France and canoed through Lake Huron and Lake Superior, and then became the first European known to have entered Lake Michigan. Nicolet proceeded into Green Bay, which he named La Baie des Puants (literally “The Stinking Bay”), and probably came ashore near the Red Banks. He made contact with the Ho-Chunk and Menominee living in the area and established peaceful relations. Nicolet remained with the Ho-Chunk the winter before he returned to Quebec.The Beaver Wars fought between the Iroquois and the French prevented French explorers from returning to Wisconsin until 1652-1654, when Pierre Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers arrived at La Baie des Puants to trade furs. They returned to Wisconsin in 1659-1660, this time at Chequamegon Bay on Lake Superior. On their second voyage they found that the Ojibwe had expanded into northern Wisconsin, as they continued to prosper in the fur trade. They also were the first Europeans to contact the Santee Dakota. They built a trading post and wintered near Ashland, before returning to Montreal. In 1665 Claude-Jean Allouez, a Jesuit missionary, built a mission on Lake Superior. Five years later he abandoned the mission, and journeyed to La Baie des Puants. Two years later he built St. Francis Xavier Mission near present-day De Pere. In his journeys through Wisconsin, he encountered groups of Native Americans who had been displaced by Iroquois in the Beaver Wars. He evangelized the Algonquin-speaking Potawatomi, who had settled on the Door Peninsula after fleeing Iroquois attacks in Michigan. He also encountered the Algonquin-speaking Sauk, who had been forced into Michigan by the Iroquois, and then had been forced into central Wisconsin by the Ojibwe and the Huron.

The next major expedition into Wisconsin was that of Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet in 1673. After hearing rumors from Indians telling of the existence of the Mississippi River, Marquette and Joliet set out from St. Ignace, in what is now Michigan, and entered the Fox River at Green Bay. They canoed up the Fox until they reached the river’s westernmost point, and then portaged, or carried their boats, to the nearby Wisconsin River, where they resumed canoeing downstream to the Mississippi River. Marquette and Joliet reached the Mississippi near what is now Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin in June, 1673. Nicolas Perrot, French commander of the west, established Fort St. Nicholas at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin in May, 1685, near the southwest end of the Fox-Wisconsin Waterway. Perrot also built a fort on the shores of Lake Pepin called Fort St. Antoine in 1686, and a second fort, called Fort Perrot, on an island on Lake Peppin shortly after. In 1727, Fort Beauharnois was constructed on what is now the Minnesota side of Lake Pepin to replace the two previous forts. A fort and a Jesuit mission were also built on the shores of Lake Superior at La Pointe, in present-day Wisconsin, in 1693 and operated until 1698. A second fort was built on the same site in 1718 and operated until 1759. These were not military posts, but rather small storehouses for furs. During the French colonial period, the first black people came to Wisconsin. The first record of a black person comes from 1725, when a black slave was killed along with four French men in a Native American raid on Green Bay. Other French fur traders and military personnel brought slaves with them to Wisconsin later in 1700s.

None of the French posts had permanent settlers; fur traders and missionaries simply visited them from time to time to conduct business. By the mid-1840s, the population of Wisconsin Territory had exceeded 150,000, more than twice the number of people required for Wisconsin to become a state. In 1846, the territorial legislature voted to apply for statehood. That fall, 124 delegates debated the state constitution. The document produced by this convention was considered extremely progressive for its time. It banned commercial banking, granted married women the right to own property, and left the question of African-American suffrage to a popular vote. Most Wisconsinites considered the first constitution to be too radical, however, and voted it down in an April 1847 referendum.In December 1847, a second constitutional convention was called. This convention resulted in a new, more moderate state constitution that Wisconsinites approved in a March 1848 referendum, enabling Wisconsin to become the 30th state on May 29, 1848. Wisconsin was the last state entirely east of the Mississippi River (and by extension the last state formed entirely from territory assigned to the U.S. in the 1783 Treaty of Paris) to be admitted to the Union. With statehood, came the creation of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, which is the state’s oldest public university. The creation of this university was set aside in the state charter.

WHERE TO FIND US:
Accurate Basement Repair
3125 E Allerton Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53235
Call us at (414) 744-6900